Integra Contemporary & Electroacoustics

Integra Contemporary & Electroacoustics is a student ensemble that focuses on the interpretation of contemporary art music with and without electronic music components. In Integra, we build on traditional performance and compositional practices, as well as experiment with new instrumentalities, creating new performance paradigms and exploring a potential for increased musical expressivity through technology.  The integration of new instrumentalities with acoustic instruments (saxophones, guitars, didgeridoo, accordions, voices, percussion instruments, digital turntable, MOOG Voyager,  wii remotes, microphones, etc.) is an exciting aspect of the ensemble formation and leads to a very wide range of diverse and often unexpected sound combinations.

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ICE EVENT on 3 December, 2018

ICE ensemble holds the first-ever “Algorave” at U of L. New music created by real-time computer scripting and live coding (TidalCycles, SuperCollider, Haskell). Pushing musical boundaries. Exploring the limits of electroacoustic sound, improvisation and performance art with ICE.

7:00pm
Monday, December 3
The Zoo, Student Union, uLethbridge
Free admission

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unnamed soundsculpture by Daniel Franke & Cedric Kiefer (film)

In April, 2017, Integra Contemporary & Electroacoustics presented their final event of the academic year, entitled Film, Sound & Space. Our concert showcased the hard work of the members of the ensemble: Digital Audio Arts students from the University of Lethbridge. In addition, we featured video, a 360° film, and a web browser-based graphic novel, among other pieces and improvisations.

I want to thank Daniel Franke and Cedric Kiefer for letting reinterpret the musical accompaniment to their original work, entitled unnamed soundsculpture: embodiment of sound (2012), and I want to acknowledge onformative.com for facilitating this collaboration.

For more information about the production of the film, go to:
onformative.com/work/unnamed-soundsculpture

Other Electroacoustic Ensemble videos at https://vimeo.com/album/2201064

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CrawlSpace by Bryn Hewko (360° film)

In April, 2017, Integra Contemporary & Electroacoustics presented their final event of the academic year, entitled Film, Sound & Space. Our concert showcased the hard work of the members of the ensemble: Digital Audio Arts students from the University of Lethbridge. In addition, we featured video, a 360° film, and a web browser-based graphic novel, among other pieces and improvisations.

I want to thank Bryn Hewko for permitting us to work with his 360° film, entitled CrawlSpace (2016), and I want to acknowledge the assistance of the New Media Department and “AGILITY” at uLethbridge. New Media supplied us with an Oculus Rift and AGILITY donated several uLethbridge-branded Google Cardboard for the participating audience.

The performance begins after a one-minute introduction.

Other Electroacoustic Ensemble videos at https://vimeo.com/album/2201064

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Seldom Somber by David Schlatter (film)

In April, 2017, Integra Contemporary & Electroacoustics presented their final event of the academic year, entitled Film, Sound & Space. Our concert showcased the hard work of the members of the ensemble: Digital Audio Arts students from the University of Lethbridge. In addition, we featured video, a 360° film, and a web browser-based graphic novel, among other pieces and improvisations.

I want to thank David Schlatter for permitting us to work with his film, entitled Seldom Somber (2016), and I want to acknowledge the musicians of “Inside the Baxter Building” for facilitating this collaboration and inspiring me with their own musical setting of Seldom Somber.

Other Electroacoustic Ensemble videos at https://vimeo.com/album/2201064

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Integra Contemporary and Electroacoustics (ICE) in rehearsal for 360° Film, Sound & Space

ICE “in rehearsal” – making music to film, Seldom Somber, by David Schlatter. Come to the concert on 8 April, Lethbridge [Canada]

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ICE EVENT on 8 April, 2017

Integra Contemporary & Electroacoustics (ICE) presents:

360° Film, Sound & Space

Featuring…

Improvisations by the members of ICE
Electroacoustic world premiere by Jon Martin
Films by Bryn Hewko, David Schlatter, as well as Daniel Franke & Cedric Kiefer
Browser-based graphic novel by Autumn Read
Artwork by Jamie-Lee Girodat
Special participation from the students of W. H. Croxford High

…bring you 360-degree headsets and phones!

7:30pm
Saturday, April 8
uLethbridge Recital Hall
Free admission

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Creating Sounds in ES P (Logic Pro X)

By Jon Martin

Overview

In this post, you will learn about how the parameters in the ES P virtual instrument in Logic Pro X can be used to shape a synthesized sound.

Before beginning, confirm that your speakers or headphones are functioning and that the system volume level is set to a moderate level.

Launch program and create new document

 

  1. Launch the Logic Pro application, located in the Applications folder.

>/Applications/Logic Pro

  1. Create a new Logic document by navigating to:

>File>New

Loading ES P

We will now load the ES P plugin.

  1. Create a new track with the ES P virtual instrument loaded. You can load the instrument by creating a new virtual instrument track, selecting the “Instrument” plug in section, and choosing ES P (Polyphonic synth) from the menu.

 

 

  1. Press Cmd+K (Logic Pro X) or Caps Lock (Logic Pro 9) to make the keyboard appear.
  1. Take a few minutes and switch through the ten provided sound presets and make some sound with each using the Musical Typing Keyboard.
  1. You will notice how the parameters of the ES P interface change as you move between presets.

ES P Parameters

We will now investigate the plugin controls. We will be looking at three main sections of the plugin: the synthesis engine on the left side, the resonance/filter section in the middle, and the ADSR section on the right.

martinesp3

  1. The Oscillator section allows you to control the type of oscillators that make up the sound produced by the plugin. From left to right, you have the triangle, sawtooth, and rectangle waves. The next two faders are sub-octave generators, the first controlling the amount generated one octave below the sound from the first three faders, and the second dropping two octaves. The final fader controls the amount of white noise that introduced into the sound. To the left of the faders are three button labelled 4, 8, and 16, which determine which octave the sound produced resides in.
  2. The Filter section introduces a low-pass filter into the signal. It reduces the range of frequencies produced about the cutoff point (labelled as frequency). The 1/3, 2/3, and 3/3 control the octave range that is covered by the lowpass filter. 1/3 will cut off the least amount of signal, while 3/3 will cut off the most. The resonance control allows you to choose how much the signal is boosted at the cutoff frequency. Changing the amount of resonance will drastically change the synthesized sound.
  3. The Envelope section allows you to control the attack (A), decay (D), sustain (S), and release (R) characteristics of the sound produced. By using ADSR to shape the volume envelope of the sound, you can create familiar or completely new sounds.
  4. The remaining controls offer additional ways to change the sound produced, including distortion and chorus effects, a low frequency oscillator, and additional envelope parameters that will not be used I this tutorial.

Creating a sound

We will use the plugin parameters to create a basic synthesized sound.

  1. Use the Recall Default setting in the preset menu to reset the plugin the its default parameters.
  2. Begin by setting all of the oscillator values to zero, at their lowest position.
  3. Raise the triangle wave slider about halfway up. Use the Musical Typing Keyboard to produce a sound.
  4. Next, raise the noise slider to add sharper attack characteristics to the sound. While making sound, find a position that you like.
  5. Select the 8’ octave range.
  6. Next we will move to the Filter section. Raise both the Frequency and Resonance controls fully clockwise and play a sound. You may have to hold down the key to hear the complete sound.
  7. Now lower the frequency control until it is cutting off the signal at a position that is pleasing.
  8. The “laserbeam” like quality to the sound is caused by self-oscillation created by having the Resonance set very high. Reduce the Resonance control until it is positively contributing to the synthesized sound and not causing unwanted distraction. You may change or lower to octave range of the filter to lessen the overall effect.
  9. Now we move to the Envelope section. The A control sets how long it takes for a sound to reach its maximum amplitude. The D control sets how long it takes for the sound to go from its maximum to resting level. The S control sets how long the sound remains at its resting level. The R control sets how long the sound takes to return to silence after the key has been released.
  10. Starting with all ADSR controls at zero, beginning moving them from left to right to shape the envelope characteristics of the synthesized sound. Moving the slider up increases the time value.

You will notice that longer attack values will require a longer key press to allow the sound to become audible from silence. Shorter values may imply percussive sounds, while longer sounds may evoke legato strings.

  1. Modify the ADSR values until a satisfactory sound is being produced. Use this sounds to play a few simple melodies, making changes to the parameters as necessary to increase the sound quality and function of the instrument.
  2. Finally, use the two sub-oscillator sliders to add lower harmonics to the sound. You may need to use high quality speakers or headphones to hear the change occurring due to low frequency content not being played back on smaller speakers.
  3. Once a desired sound has been created, click on the preset menu and click Save As… to save the sound for later use.
  4. Go through this process several times until three contrasting and useful sounds have been created.

Closing the application

  1. Close the Logic application by selecting Logic Pro > Quit Logic Pro.
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